What we can learn from Hogeweyk and other unique care villages

Hogeweyk, a village in the Netherlands made up of seniors living with dementia and their caretakers, was developed in 2009 after a nearly 20-year stint as a traditional nursing home. The concept captures attention in our industry for its innovative approach to caring for people with memory loss. Since Hogeweyk’s inception, other similar villages followed the unique design, both in the United States and abroad. Much of Hogeweyk’s design features a host of activities that focus on individual tastes—a part of what we have now come to know as person-centered care for dementia.

If you haven’t heard about Hogeweyk, it’s a village of 23 homes, a grocery store, entertainment venues and parklike spaces. While a resident can shop in the store or even buy a beer at a pub, for those with advanced dementia, the currency they use is fake. But, to them, the experience of living in this village is very real.

Rising needs for memory care

As we reported in our “Memory Care Facility Design” blog last March, as baby boomers age, we can expect a significant uptick in the need for memory care. The industry is already responding, according to the National Investment Center for Seniors Housing and Care (NIC). The NIC says that at the end of 2015, the industry added more than 7,000 memory care units in 2015 alone, a 7.4 percent increase. At the end of 2015, 12,200 memory care units were under construction.

It may come as no surprise, then, that those who are preparing for an influx of residents needing memory care look to unique practices for ideas on how to provide the best care to this population. That’s where person-centered care for dementia finds success.

Memory care trends point to person-centered care

Very few in the industry have the financial ability to build a village, but the feeling of inclusion and independence is something that can be replicated. Although more than 150 people live in the village, it remains a great example of person-centered care. Studies have shown that in person-centered care, dementia patients respond positively to participating in activities they personally enjoy, having a say in their care and living in a homelike environment.

LeadingAge discussed some ways members are making personal connections—and therefore focusing on the individual—in memory care. Here are just a few of the ideas:

  • A senior living community in Louisville, Ky., learns the life story of residents before they enter care. Residents are paired with a “best friend,” who helps make connections to their life before they entered a senior living community.
  • This same facility uses these life stories to find ways to calm agitated residents. A former lawyer is given a legal brief to read when he becomes upset; a former baker is given flour to work with, as if to make biscuits.
  • Many communities find other ways for residents to participate in activities that were once a big part of their lives. For example, pianists and singers entertain or lead religious service hymns.

It’s important to also note that person-centered care focuses as much on what individuals don’t like to do. One Texas administrator pointed to the popular activity of bingo as an example of understanding individual tastes, “Some people absolutely hate the number calling … and the repetitiveness. Why are you going to put someone in that position if it’s something that they don’t tolerate?”

Ask us how we can help

As you can see, you don’t need to build an entire village to find ways to implement person-centered care for dementia. But, you will need to find ways—inside and outside of your facility—to accommodate residents’ favored activities. Nature lovers will appreciate courtyards and walking trails. Artists may want a quiet, well-lit area to practice their craft.

If you are considering remodeling your community to accommodate memory care patients or are thinking about adding a memory care unit to your current facility, give us a call. Our process begins with a master plan that includes a market analysis. For your free consultation, contact Terry McLaughlin at 920-969-9344.